Glossary

This glossary provides definitions of many of the terms used within this website and when discussing meditation in general.

Acharya:
(in South Asia) a Hindu or Buddhist spiritual teacher or leader.

Alertness:
the quality of being alert.

Analytical:
relating to or using analysis or logical reasoning.

Anchoress
a female anchorite

Anchorite:
a religious recluse.

Anticipation:
the action of anticipating something; expectation or prediction.

Ascetic:
characterized by severe self-discipline and abstention from all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons.

Ashram‎
(especially in South Asia) a hermitage, monastic community, or other place of religious retreat.

Attainment:
the action or fact of achieving a goal towards which one has worked.

Austere:
severe or strict in manner or attitude.

Awareness:
knowledge or perception of a situation or fact.

Being:
the nature or essence of a person.

Belief:
an acceptance that something exists or is true, especially one without proof.

Brain:
an organ of soft nervous tissue contained in the skull of vertebrates, functioning as the coordinating centre of sensation and intellectual and nervous activity.

Calm:
not showing or feeling nervousness, anger, or other strong emotions

Celibate:
abstaining from marriage and sexual relations, typically for religious / spiritual reasons.

Characteristic:
typical of a particular person, place, or thing.

Concentration:
the action or power of focusing all one’s attention.

Consciousness:
the state of being aware of and responsive to one’s surroundings.

Contemplation:
the action of looking thoughtfully at something for a long time.

Contemplative:
expressing or involving prolonged thought.

Daydream:
a series of pleasant thoughts that distract one’s attention from the present.

Deity:
a god or goddess (in a polytheistic religion).

Dogma:
a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true.

Devotion:
love, loyalty, or enthusiasm for a person or activity / religious worship or observance.

Dharma:
(in Indian religion) the eternal law of the cosmos, inherent in the very nature of things.

Divine:
of or like God or a god.

Divinity:
the state or quality of being divine.

Dream:
a series of thoughts, images, and sensations occurring in a person’s mind during sleep.

Ease:
absence of difficulty or effort

Essence:
the intrinsic nature or indispensable quality of something, especially something abstract, which determines its character.

Ego:
a person’s sense of self-esteem or self-importance.

Enlightenment:
the action of enlightening or the state of being enlightened.

Expectation:
a strong belief that something will happen or be the case.

Faith:
complete trust or confidence in someone or something / strong belief in the doctrines of a religion, based on spiritual conviction rather than proof.

Fulfilling:
making someone satisfied or happy through allowing their character or abilities to develop fully.

Fulfilment:
the achievement of something desired, promised, or predicted.

Guide:
a person who advises others, especially in matters of behaviour or belief.

Guru:
a Hindu spiritual teacher.

Habitual:
done constantly or as a habit.

Hermit:
a person living in solitude as a religious discipline

Hermit-like:
avoiding the company of other people; solitary.

Holiness:
the state of being holy / a title or form of address given to the Pope, Orthodox patriarchs, and the Dalai Lama.

Hope:
a feeling of expectation and desire for a particular thing to happen.

Ideology:
a system of ideas and ideals, especially one which forms the basis of economic or political theory and policy.

Innermost:
(of thoughts or feelings) most private and deeply felt.

Insight:
the capacity to gain an accurate and deep understanding of someone or something

Insightful:
having or showing an accurate and deep understanding; perceptive.

Instinct:
an innate, typically fixed pattern of behaviour in animals in response to certain stimuli.

Instinctive:
relating to or prompted by instinct; done without conscious thought.

Instruct:
teach (someone) a subject or skill.

Intellect:
the faculty of reasoning and understanding objectively, especially with regard to abstract matters.

Intelligence:
the ability to acquire and apply knowledge and skills.

Intuition:
the ability to understand something instinctively, without the need for conscious reasoning.

Intuitive:
using or based on what one feels to be true even without conscious reasoning; instinctive.

Inward:
directed or proceeding towards the inside; coming in from outside.

Karma:
(in Hinduism and Buddhism) the sum of a person’s actions in this and previous states of existence, viewed as deciding their fate in future existences.

Logical:
of or according to the rules of logic or formal argument.

Maharishi:
a great Hindu sage or spiritual leader

Mantra:
A mantra is a word, phrase, sound, or set of words, used according to precise guidelines, during meditation.

Meditation:
a practice in which an individual trains the mind or induces a mode of consciousness, either to realize some benefit or as an end in itself.

Meditative:
relating to or absorbed in meditation or considered thought.

Metaphysics:
the branch of philosophy that deals with the first principles of things, including abstract concepts such as being, knowing, identity, time, and space.

Mind:
the element of a person that enables them to be aware of the world and their experiences, to think, and to feel; the faculty of consciousness and thought.

Monk:
a member of a religious community of men typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.

Musing:
a period of reflection or thought.

Namaste
a respectful greeting said when giving a namaskar.

Namaskar:
a traditional Indian greeting or gesture of respect, made by bringing the palms together before the face or chest and bowing.

Natural:
existing in or derived from nature; not made or caused by humankind.

One’s spiritual home:
(phrase of spiritual) a place in which one feels a strong sense of belonging.

Oral history:
the collection and study of historical information using tape recordings of interviews with people having personal knowledge of past events.

Pandit:
a Hindu scholar learned in Sanskrit and Hindu philosophy and religion, typically also a practising priest.

Pensive:
engaged in, involving, or reflecting deep or serious thought

Personal:
belonging to or affecting a particular person rather than anyone else.

Philosophical:
relating or devoted to the study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence.

Philosophy:
the study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence, especially when considered as an academic discipline.

Practice:
the actual application or use of an idea, belief, or method, as opposed to theories relating to it.

Prayer:
a solemn request for help or expression of thanks addressed to God or another deity.

Pundit:
an expert in a particular subject or field who is frequently called upon to give their opinions to the public.

Purity:
freedom from adulteration or contamination.

Realization:
an act of becoming fully aware of something as a fact / the achievement of something desired or anticipated.

Reasoning:
the action of thinking about something in a logical, sensible way.

Reclusive:
avoiding the company of other people; solitary.

Reflective:
relating to or characterized by deep thought; thoughtful.

Relax:
make or become less tense or anxious.

Relaxation:
the state of being free from tension and anxiety.

Relaxed:
free from tension and anxiety.

Religion:
the belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God or gods.

Religious:
relating to or believing in a religion / a person bound by monastic vows.

Restful:
having a quiet and soothing quality.

Rishi:
a Hindu sage or saint.

Roshi:
the spiritual leader of a community of Zen Buddhist monks

Sage:
(especially in ancient history or legend) a profoundly wise man

Satori:
sudden enlightenment.

Sect:
a group of people with somewhat different religious beliefs (typically regarded as heretical) from those of a larger group to which they belong.

Self:
a person’s essential being that distinguishes them from others, especially considered as the object of introspection or reflexive action.

Self-abnegating:
renouncing or rejecting one’s own interests or needs.

Self-awareness:
conscious knowledge of one’s own character, feelings, motives, and desires.

Self-esteem:
confidence in one’s own worth or abilities; self-respect.

Self-respect:
pride and confidence in oneself; a feeling that one is behaving with honour and dignity.

Serene:
calm, peaceful, and untroubled; tranquil.

Sixth sense:
a supposed intuitive faculty giving awareness not explicable in terms of normal perception.

Solitary:
done or existing alone.

Soul:
the spiritual or immaterial part of a human being or animal, regarded as immortal.

Spirit:
the non-physical part of a person which is the seat of emotions and character; the soul.

Spiritual:
relating to or affecting the human spirit or soul as opposed to material or physical things.

Spirituality:
Those who speak of spirituality outside of religion often define themselves as spiritual but not religious and generally believe in the existence of different “spiritual paths,” emphasizing the importance of finding one’s own individual path to spirituality.

Subconscious:
of or concerning the part of the mind of which one is not fully aware but which influences one’s actions and feelings.

Subliminal:
(of a stimulus or mental process) below the threshold of sensation or consciousness; perceived by or affecting someone’s mind without their being aware of it.

Success:
the accomplishment of an aim or purpose.

Swami:
a Hindu male religious teacher.

Teach:
impart knowledge to or instruct (someone) as to how to do something.

Teaching:
the occupation, profession, or work of a teacher.

Theology:
the study of the nature of God and religious belief.

Thinker:
a person who thinks deeply and seriously.

Thinking:
the process of considering or reasoning about something.

Thought:
an idea or opinion produced by thinking, or occurring suddenly in the mind.

Thoughtful:
absorbed in or involving thought.

Tradition:
the transmission of customs or beliefs from generation to generation, or the fact of being passed on in this way.

Traditional:
existing in or as part of a tradition; long-established.

Trance:
a half-conscious state characterized by an absence of response to external stimuli, typically as induced by hypnosis or entered by a medium.

Transcend:
be or go beyond the range or limits of (a field of activity or conceptual sphere).

Transcendent:
beyond or above the range of normal or physical human experience

Tutor:
a private teacher, typically one who teaches a single pupil or a very small group

Unconscious:
not awake and aware of and responding to one’s environment.

Unexpressed:
(of a thought or feeling) not communicated or made known.

Unique:
being the only one of its kind; unlike anything else.

Unrevealed:
not revealed; secret / “some feelings can run so deep that they are better left unrevealed”

Wisdom:
the quality of having experience, knowledge, and good judgement; the quality of being wise.

Yogi
a person who is proficient in yoga.

Yoga
a Hindu spiritual and ascetic discipline, a part of which, including breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practised for health and relaxation.

If you think that you are ready to learn how to meditate,
give me a call, Warwick Jones, 09 419 5380